Stroke could happen to any of us, just like it happened to Peter Couche – as a healthy, outgoing 42 year old business man and father of three on a trip through Singapore.

Peter’s stroke occurred over 20 years ago and he has since lived with “Locked-In syndrome” – Peter’s brain is as sharp and active as ever but he has virtually no physical abilities. 

Since his stroke, Peter has amazed everyone with his patience, persistence and positive attitude.

It took Peter more than thirteen years to record the inspiring story of his struggle for a normal life, away from the mind-numbing world of institutions. Lifelines is a love story and an account of the hope provided by medical research and stem cell therapy. Peter's journey writing Lifelines was also captured on ABC's Australian Story in 2007.

Peter established his Foundation at the University of Adelaide in 2010 and to date has raised over $850,000 to support stroke research and raise awareness of the impact of stroke.

In 2010, Peter was awarded the Pride of Australia Medal for Courage which recognised his determination and strength of character to overcome personal adversity and and more recently, Peter was a finalist as the Senior South Australian of the Year.

Above all Peter Couche shows how miracles can happen if we fight hard enough.

Certainly I would like to walk, talk and eat again – of course I would – but I suspect the restoration of lost functions may be of more significance to the next generation.

Therefore I see my role as that of an “agent for change” so future generations can benefit from the medical advancements supported by the Peter Couche Foundation.
— Peter Couche, Founder